Rear End Collisions

One of the most common forms of auto accidents on roadways in our society is a rear end collision. A rear end collision occurs when one driver hits another driver in the back of the vehicle. One rear end collision can cause multiple collisions when the vehicle that was hit then is forced into another vehicle. One common cause of a rear end collision can is a motorist abruptly stopping or slowing down, causing vehicles traveling behind that vehicle to hit the vehicle in front of them. This sudden decrease in movement may not be noticed and the driver traveling behind may not have enough time to slow down. Rear end collisions are also caused by a driver negligently or aggressively following another driver too closely for conditions existing at the time of the accident. There are numerous other examples of negligent driving where the full time and attention to the roadway is not considered such as speeding, playing with the radio or navigation system, use of a cell phone or being under the influence or drugs or alcohol. If an accident is caused by such negligence, the driver is responsible for the ensuing accident.

It’s extremely important when driving at any speed to leave the proper amount of space between your vehicle and the car in front of you. If you travel too closely to the vehicle in front of you, you may not be giving yourself enough room to stop in the event the car in front of you stops or slows down abruptly. Negligent drivers are not the only reason why rear ended collisions happen. Weather and road conditions may also increase the risk of a rear end collision. In the event of heavy rain or snow, you may need to give extra space for cars around you.

Fortunately most (but not all) rear end collisions happen at a low speed. This means injuries associated with rear end collisions are not always as severe as they could otherwise be. However, many experts will testify that the speed involved in a collision does not necessarily dictate a minor injury. There are a lot of other factors involved. Turning the head prior to being struck causes additional torque to the neck and can cause more severe injury, even in a low speed collision. The most common injury sustained from a low speed rear end collision is whiplash or what medical professionals may cal an acceleration/deceleration injury. Whiplash is treatable and if therapy is instituted quickly can lead to resolution of symptoms. However, lingering pain and permanent injury can also result from what appears to be a minor collision. Rear end collisions are the same as hitting a non moving object such as a wall. Therefore, if you hit another car and your vehicle is going 40MPH the force of the impact would be 20MPH. On the other hand, if both vehicles are moving in opposite directions at the time of an impact, the force of the impact could possibly be double the speed at which the contact was made.

Who is at fault?

With rear end collisions, the driver that hit the car from the rear is almost always at fault for the accident. This is because they did not give proper space in between the car in front of them and were traveling too fast for conditions existing a the time of the accident. Additionally, the driver of the vehicle may have been traveling too fast or did not react fast enough to avoid impact. Accordingly, the at fault driver may be responsible for all damages associated with the accident. If you have been rear ended you may want to speak to our Maryland auto accident lawyers. Our attorneys understand rear end collisions and handle auto accident cases on a daily basis. Just because the accident may have happened at a low speed it does not mean you do not have a case, or that the injuries may not be severe. Who is going to pay for your medical expenses or lost wages? If you were not at fault you should not have to pay for those expenses or car repair costs.

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